2020 and finally seeing the difference after my Osteotomy

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In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy operation as I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed an alternative to a knee replacement operation.

In 2019, I went under the surgeons knife again to have the metal plates removed from my leg. I am writing this blog to help others who may be starting their own recovery journey

If you enjoy reading my blog entry, don’t forget to like, follow, share and comment!

Its been a while since my last post in December 2019. The rubbish winter in the UK has been extremely wet and damp, I did miss the snow. 2020 is my year to be surgery free and to get stronger.

At work my role changed to become the regional lead for the Microsoft Azure Professional Services practice for DXC Technology (large American IT systems Integrator). This does mean longer hours but at least I am able to work from home.

Working from home has allowed me to visit the gym more frequently and for 2 -3 days a week, I focus on weight training and it really has helped. The key exercises that made a difference are shown below.

Hamstring building
Leg extension

I did have to take my time and build up strength gradually.

Prior to my operation, I never focused on leg weight training and it was only when I went through Physiotherapy the physio explained the impact of muscle mass improving stability and stamina.

For me it has helped with better leg movement, reduction of swelling and increased stamina. As the months have elapsed I have noticed the difference.

I am probably at 75% mobility in my knee and the pains have substantially decreased (but still not gone)

Post Tibial Osteotomy- recovery from the removal of metal plates

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In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy operation at the One Hatfield Hospital in the UK. I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed a solution that would avoid a knee replacement operation and get my life back to some level of normality.

If you enjoyed reading my blog entry, don’t forget to like, follow, share and comment!

Its been a while since I last blogged an update as my daughter guest blogged about our family trip to Mexico; she is writing another post and will appear once she is done. 

OK, so my last post ended with me returning home after the removal of the metal plates that was conducted by Mr Minhal Chatoo at the One Hatfield Hospital in March 2019 (earlier this year).

Whilst at home I realized that I get a very bad reaction to Codiene so had to stop taking that pain killer; rather stayed on the Ibuprofen and paracetamol.

Lets focus on the recovery points..

2 Days after operation

The swelling had reduced. Pain killers were working and I was able to move around slowly on crutches. The arrow was drawn on my leg by the surgeon (so he doesn’t carve open the wrong leg).

2 Weeks after operation

Mobility was better as I was using the crutches on occasion and visited the gym to do light cycle work. I wanted to build up stamina. It did help that prior to this operation that I had continued doing the exercises given to me by my physio as well as the work done in the gym. This way I was moving and recovering much faster than the previous year.

3 weeks after the operation

So a close up of the scar and I am pleased with the outcome. No infection but just the pain expected from further bone healing after the removal of the plates and screws.

In my next blog I will return to a Q & A post sharing questions I was asked by friends and family.

If you are about to go into surgery or at home in recovery mode, why not shoot me a few questions?

Returning to the operating table – removal of metal work. Osteotomy concluded

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In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy operation at the One Hatfield Hospital in the UK. I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed a solution that would avoid a knee replacement operation and get my life back to some level of normality.

If you enjoyed reading my blog entry, don’t forget to like, follow, share and comment!

Returning in 2019 to remove the metalwork

The osteotomy had given me a lot of improvement. The physio work and muscle built around my knees in the gym has given me 90% of my life back. The knee issue hasn’t gone away but I feel so much stronger, some pain does remain but this differs from day to day – that’s just the ageing process!

RHS shows healed bone

As the metalwork in my leg did irritate me from time to time, I took my surgeons advice and booked myself in to have the metalwork removed on 27th March 2019. Mr Minhal Chatoo would be my surgeon again. He was brilliant.

The metal work extraction procedure would be a day case. The procedure would take up to 1 hour to remove the screws and plates. Due to the nature of the operation, I would be under general anesthetic, meaning the time in the operating theatre increases to allow for the time to recover as well.

Upon arrival and being allocated a room at the hospital, one of the nurses came in and read my BP, went through standard paper work, handed over a gown, pants and socks – I’m not sharing any pictures of that!

Shortly after, the anesthetist came round as well and confirmed that Mr Chatoo would be operating on me as the first patient of his day.

Mr Chatoo came in to mark my leg before the operation and we had a light hearted conversation. He mentioned the operation is very quick and low risk so was happy to proceed.

Once he left, I was taken downstairs to the operating theatre. As I walked down someone talked me through the procedure again and kept me assured.

Once I was asked to lay down on the bed, I was connected to the ECG and given the anethestic. In seconds, I was out.

Coming round after the operation

I felt groggy after the operation. It was about 10:20 am as I noticed the clock. They showed me the metalwork that was removed from my leg – 2 pins 4 inches long, 3 screws 3 inches long and 6 other smaller screws. They told me I was unable to keep the screws due to protocol; though I wish I could have kept them as a souvenir…

The pain was unbearable and the nurses gave me strong pain killers. 20mins later, it still felt bad so they gave me more – but I think it was codeine. 

Shortly after I was taken back upstairs to my room and Loiza was sat waiting. 

I remember falling in and out of sleep and still in pain. To me, this felt much more painful than the osteotomy last year. 

It took a while for me to eat lunch (soup and a sandwich), just the tiredness from the drugs and the pain. 

I remember the Physio “Saul” visit . He got me out of the bed and made me go for a walk. We made it to a stairwell and then down a flight of stairs. He did say the pain will be high but I will need to get moving sooner. The recovery period would be :

  1. Next 2 days full rest and some movement
  2. Use crutches for a few days after that
  3. Walk without crutches thereafter
  4. Keep moving and apply icepacks if there is swelling

The recovery period was a lot shorter but I kept in mind that there was a deep cut, stitches and several holes in my tibia that would take time to recover.

I was able to walk however I was very tired due to the drugs. I made it back to the room and then met Mr Chatoo again. I remember him telling me that he placed “wax plugs in the screw holes!” to reduce the bleeding from the bone. 

Mr Chatoo also said the operation was uneventful- this is good news.

I rested again and of course, fell asleep. When I came round again I was still in pain and was given more painkillers. 

The nurse mentioned that I could be discharged once Mr Chatoo comes round at about 5 pm. The discharge was quick and easy and everything was set for me to go home.

I was wheelchaired to the car – We drove home in my Audi. The ride was great as I was glad to be going home. 

When I got home, we took the picture below.

I was exhausted. I slept in Aroon’s room and was out as soon as I hit the pillow. I know I woke up in the middle night and Loiza had to help me to go to the restroom – it was still to early and I was unsteady on my feet – the drugs were not helping and as it transpired I had a bad reaction to the codeine.

Should I have the metal plates removed 12 months after the Tibial Osteotomy?

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In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy at the One Hatfield Hospital in the UK. I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed a solution that would avoid a knee replacement operation and get my life back to some level of normality.

In December 2018, I was thinking more seriously about going back into hospital to have my plates removed. In the last couple of months I was experiencing more irritation caused by the metal plates in my leg. My surgeon did mention this could happen when during my last consultation. I spent a lot of time thinking the knee pain returned, but simple self investigation by pressing on the affected area, it was clearly in the region of where the metal plates were located. The pain would appear in the following ways:

  1. Swelling beneath the knee area – The remedy was to use ice packs to reduce the swelling.
  2. Itchiness beneath the skin- not much I can do other than trying not to scratch the scar area.

In retrospect I didn’t really feel 100% fully recovered and did experience stiffness and pain in the knee area that was brought on by the following :

  1. Tiredness caused by lack of sleep
  2. Stiffness when sat in the same position in a chair in the office
  3. Excessive exercise such as treadmill running.
  4. Leg pain for standing up too long.

The remedy really was to take painkillers to reduce the swelling and of course, to rest.  In conclusion I saw myself as 70% recovered – still much better than what I was like before the operation. I found my picture below from our family trip to Athens, Greece where I raced my wife on the ancient Olympic track. Who would have thought that Will I run again!

Just the action shot of me running . Ok Loiza beats me at the end

Clearly I can run again!

My thoughts on returning to the hospital were something else….it would be my 3rd operation in 3 years – I was fed up with going into hospital and then taking time out (a good few months) to rehabilitate thereafter. I am softy at the end of the day!

A lot of points to consider…..

Loiza felt I should go ahead with the plate removal. Due to my private health insurance, I would be able to go back to the same private hospital (the OneHatfield) and have the operation done on a day that is convenient for me. It would be silly if I did not do do this.

Well thats it for now….I need to find a simple view/photo of my Tibial Osteotomy showing pre-operation planning and the affects of the surgery. As soon as I find it, I will post it.

Thanks for stopping by!

Tibial Osteotomy photo review – Post op to 6 weeks after. Part 2

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In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy at the One Hatfield Hospital in the UK. I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed a solution that would avoid a knee replacement operation and get my life back to some level of normality.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is knee.jpg

As a follow on from last weeks blog, I am sharing photos taken from pre-op to 6 weeks after. During the process of finding the pictures after 12 months and knowing that I am much better now, it does bring memories back of the journey of recovery and change. When you are in the moment, it is tough but as I noted in a previous blog, the human bodies capability to repair is incredible. The is light at the end of the tunnel!

Day 3- 5 Swelling and bruising


#After 3-5 days, expect bruising and discoloring to appear – the healing process

Days 6-8 I want to remove the bandaging!!

So in total I have 16 metal clips. Awesome!

Days 14 Metal Clips are out

Removal of clips are not that painful. Now I can think about Physiotherapy

Week 5-6 and the wound is healing well!

Healing in progress and Physio kicking in.

I hope the helps you out there. If you have any questions shoot me a message. See you next week!

Tibial Osteotomy photo review – Post op to 6 weeks after. Part 1

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In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy at the One Hatfield Hospital in the UK. I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed a solution that would avoid a knee replacement operation and get my life back to some level of normality.

For this weeks blog, I am sharing photos taken from pre-op to 6 weeks after. On creating this post, you have to realize the human body has amazing recovery capabilities, the repairs to the bone, muscle, tendons and skin are simultaneous!. When you are going through it on a daily basis it can feel like sh!t – don’t worry, you will get better!

Pre-Op mark up

Pre-op and before the leg shaving, Mr Chatoo marked my operating leg.

Post Op – compression bag on leg to reduce swelling

May be 2-3 hours after i came round from the op, you cannot feel a thing.

After 1 day, compression bag removed

There is a lot of bandage, but where is my other leg?

Day 2 – Getting ready for home, remove the bandages

This is the best part, time to go home.

Looks like I have run out of space, stay tuned the next post will continue the journey.

Quickfire questions on life before and after Osteotomy procedure.

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So this blog is written by Priya. We met with my surgeon Mr Minhal Chatoo at the One Hatfield hospital on 8th May and he recommended Priya interviews me to share how life has changed pre- and post- Osteotomy.

Hi, Priya here. I thought of a bunch of questions to ask my dad about his progress.


This is Hertford Castle, near where we live and where we went for a walk.


How has the pain around your leg changed since the Osteotomy operation?
Every day and every week I notice that the pain is getting less. However I do notice new pains appearing. The swelling in my leg is still there but is gradually reducing. The Osteotemy does entail bone cutting, drilling, cutting deep into flesh, muscle and many nerves. It does take a long time for the healing process to complete.

What life changes have you made since your first diagnosis?

I have made an effort to lose weight and eat the right foods. I have cut down alcohol, sugar and some types of meat. I have had to stop jogging due to the impact on my knees however I have now started going to the gym more where I run on the treadmill, use the cross trainer and lift weights to strengthen my core. If I can lose more weight I may be able to run again.

How has the operation influenced your life now?

To be more aware of long term health. I know I cannot run as much or kick a football about as much, so I need to find new sports/pass times to get involved in. Also life is about longevity so doing the right exercise is key.

How might the operation impact others around you?

As his daughter I have seen a urge in my father to lose weight and really exercise more. The effect this has on me is that as a family we go out and walk in different new locations on a weekly basis. This is a more active effect on my life and it’s for the better, as we are also eating healthier and experimenting more activities.

How do you think you can help others?

If you are young enough and want to continue having an active life, there is an alternative to a knee replacement surgery. The operation does give you the chance to defer such an intrusive operation for a number of years. The psychological impact of getting your life back to a normal balance is very important.