Returning to the operating table – removal of metal work. Osteotomy concluded

In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy operation at the One Hatfield Hospital in the UK. I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed a solution that would avoid a knee replacement operation and get my life back to some level of normality.

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Returning in 2019 to remove the metalwork

The osteotomy had given me a lot of improvement. The physio work and muscle built around my knees in the gym has given me 90% of my life back. The knee issue hasn’t gone away but I feel so much stronger, some pain does remain but this differs from day to day – that’s just the ageing process!

RHS shows healed bone

As the metalwork in my leg did irritate me from time to time, I took my surgeons advice and booked myself in to have the metalwork removed on 27th March 2019. Mr Minhal Chatoo would be my surgeon again. He was brilliant.

The metal work extraction procedure would be a day case. The procedure would take up to 1 hour to remove the screws and plates. Due to the nature of the operation, I would be under general anesthetic, meaning the time in the operating theatre increases to allow for the time to recover as well.

Upon arrival and being allocated a room at the hospital, one of the nurses came in and read my BP, went through standard paper work, handed over a gown, pants and socks – I’m not sharing any pictures of that!

Shortly after, the anesthetist came round as well and confirmed that Mr Chatoo would be operating on me as the first patient of his day.

Mr Chatoo came in to mark my leg before the operation and we had a light hearted conversation. He mentioned the operation is very quick and low risk so was happy to proceed.

Once he left, I was taken downstairs to the operating theatre. As I walked down someone talked me through the procedure again and kept me assured.

Once I was asked to lay down on the bed, I was connected to the ECG and given the anethestic. In seconds, I was out.

Coming round after the operation

I felt groggy after the operation. It was about 10:20 am as I noticed the clock. They showed me the metalwork that was removed from my leg – 2 pins 4 inches long, 3 screws 3 inches long and 6 other smaller screws. They told me I was unable to keep the screws due to protocol; though I wish I could have kept them as a souvenir…

The pain was unbearable and the nurses gave me strong pain killers. 20mins later, it still felt bad so they gave me more – but I think it was codeine. 

Shortly after I was taken back upstairs to my room and Loiza was sat waiting. 

I remember falling in and out of sleep and still in pain. To me, this felt much more painful than the osteotomy last year. 

It took a while for me to eat lunch (soup and a sandwich), just the tiredness from the drugs and the pain. 

I remember the Physio “Saul” visit . He got me out of the bed and made me go for a walk. We made it to a stairwell and then down a flight of stairs. He did say the pain will be high but I will need to get moving sooner. The recovery period would be :

  1. Next 2 days full rest and some movement
  2. Use crutches for a few days after that
  3. Walk without crutches thereafter
  4. Keep moving and apply icepacks if there is swelling

The recovery period was a lot shorter but I kept in mind that there was a deep cut, stitches and several holes in my tibia that would take time to recover.

I was able to walk however I was very tired due to the drugs. I made it back to the room and then met Mr Chatoo again. I remember him telling me that he placed “wax plugs in the screw holes!” to reduce the bleeding from the bone. 

Mr Chatoo also said the operation was uneventful- this is good news.

I rested again and of course, fell asleep. When I came round again I was still in pain and was given more painkillers. 

The nurse mentioned that I could be discharged once Mr Chatoo comes round at about 5 pm. The discharge was quick and easy and everything was set for me to go home.

I was wheelchaired to the car – We drove home in my Audi. The ride was great as I was glad to be going home. 

When I got home, we took the picture below.

I was exhausted. I slept in Aroon’s room and was out as soon as I hit the pillow. I know I woke up in the middle night and Loiza had to help me to go to the restroom – it was still to early and I was unsteady on my feet – the drugs were not helping and as it transpired I had a bad reaction to the codeine.

Comparing Pre and Post Osteotomy scans – a single view of change

Just a short Blog this week. As per last week I wanted to share single point of view on the positive impact of the Tibial Osteotomy can have. The image below was taken from the One Hatfield Hospital’s monthly publication.

You can see in the left hand image the surgical requirements Mr Minhal Chatoo orchestrated pre-operation. On the right hand side you can clearly see the surgical correction.

Accuracy of the surgery has to be at 95-98%. For all the planning it really is up to the expertise and training of the surgeon. I cannot recommend Mr Chatoo enough. There are a number of experts like him in the UK and worth looking into this type of operation as it saves on having a knee replacement operation.

Tibial Osteotomy photo review – Post op to 6 weeks after. Part 1

In January 2018, I underwent a Tibial Osteotomy at the One Hatfield Hospital in the UK. I had been suffering from the onset of arthritis on my right knee and needed a solution that would avoid a knee replacement operation and get my life back to some level of normality.

For this weeks blog, I am sharing photos taken from pre-op to 6 weeks after. On creating this post, you have to realize the human body has amazing recovery capabilities, the repairs to the bone, muscle, tendons and skin are simultaneous!. When you are going through it on a daily basis it can feel like sh!t – don’t worry, you will get better!

Pre-Op mark up

Pre-op and before the leg shaving, Mr Chatoo marked my operating leg.

Post Op – compression bag on leg to reduce swelling

May be 2-3 hours after i came round from the op, you cannot feel a thing.

After 1 day, compression bag removed

There is a lot of bandage, but where is my other leg?

Day 2 – Getting ready for home, remove the bandages

This is the best part, time to go home.

Looks like I have run out of space, stay tuned the next post will continue the journey.

Q &A How the Tibial Osteotomy became the recommended solution

I thought I would take time out from my diary blog in order to answer a bunch of questions that friends and family have asked me in the past.

Q: Was the cause a Sports Injury?

A: When I was younger, I was very active. Loved Martial Arts so trained 3-4 days a week; did this for over 12 years to a high level. I also played Soccer, Basketball for school, college and clubs. When I got older (into my 40’s) I took on Sprint Triathlons and 10k runs. The training takes its toll. Also I would consider myself overweight (or heavy boned 🙂 )

Q : You had an Arthroscopy and Debridement – thought that was the fix?

A: You would think that, but in effect brought on the pain more, my right leg became bow. (keyhole surgery where they wash lose cartilage from within the knee and shave some bone)

Q: Who recommended you for the tibial osteotomy?

A: I was undergoing Physiotherapy for my arthroscopy at the time and I complained the pain was getting worse. At this time, the physiotherapist recommended me to arrange a consultant session with a specialist, Mr Minhal Chatoo. He was doing some great work in surgeries that avoid having a knee replacement. I was referred to Mr Chatoo.

Mr Minhal Chatoo, Consultant Surgeon

Q: What happened during the first meeting with Mr Chatoo

A : Prior to meeting with Mr Chatoo, I went for an MRI scan and a full leg X-ray (starting from my hip down to my foot – 2 X-rays merged to 1). Mr Chatoo analysed the X-ray.

On meeting with Mr Chatoo, he shared his diagnosis and then outlined the course of correction that an Osteotemy would provide and more importantly deferring a knee operation. He also shared success stories of his previous patients. He considered me as a candidate as I was young and capable of making the right recovery.

Q: At high level, what would the surgery entail?

A : I am no expert so can only share my recall…….Mr Chatoo used software to outline where a line of gravity should pass after surgery (A line should move from the hip, down the middle of the knee and to the middle of the ankle). There was a lot of wear and tear on the inside of my right leg/knee. As my leg was bow he showed me where the line of gravity was passing versus where it should be. To achieve this, he will cut my tibia and remove enough bone (in a triangle) to allow correction. Steel plates will be applied to allow the bone to grow back and straighten my leg and to conclusively reduce the pain caused the rheumatism. I was a borderline candidate but Mr Chatoo was confident of success.

Q: Why did you proceed with the Surgery, sounds painful

A: The surgeon, Mr Chatoo was the reason. He was caring, knowledgeable, confident and human. He has a great success rate and convinced me of a decent recovery.

Right, that’s it for now, I’ll post more in a few weeks. If you have questions, post them to me and I’ll add them to another post.