Guest Blog : go visit Mexico and get involved in their culture – Chichen Itza

This weeks blog is written by my daughter Priya, a budding blogger still at school. If you enjoyed reading her blog entry, don’t forget to like, follow, share and comment!

Hi, I’m Priya and I recently went to Mexico with my family. We stayed close to a small town near Cancun; called Playa Del Carmen on the Caribbean Sea.

As you may know there are many archaeological sites in that area. If you visit Cancun, then I highly recommend you go and visit one of these sights. They all belong to the native people of Mexico who are called the Mayans.

So, who are the Mayans?

They are an ancient civilization who were prominent in central America around 900 A.D. The Mayans were a huge civilization, at their prime, it is said that their population reached 22 million. They used to build temples for their Gods made from stone and only royalty would be allowed to touch it.

2 hours from our hotel was Chichen Izta, which is a massive Mayan temple, and is one of the new seven wonders of the world. 

 Chichen Itza stands 98 feet tall and it has 91 steps on each side which totals 364 steps. Plus the one large step on the top, the Mayans created 365 steps – matching the number of days in the year. The Mayans were ahead of the game, by understanding time and how the earth rotates the sun. The temple is a huge pyramid like structure in the middle of a clearing in the centre of the jungle!

 When I first saw it, I was in awe of its size and condition, as it was very well kept. I stood there wondering, how on earth did they build this.  IT WAS SO BIG!!!

There are also other ruins on the site, such as a Mayan sport court. They played this game that was similar to hand ball (and Quidditch!) but much harder, they have to use all of their body to get the ball into a goal over 3m above them. It was very interesting to hear and see what they did for entertainment. Our guide told us that the winners would sacfrice themselves at the end of the game as a reflection of their devotion to the gods. I was surprised to hear that, as was everyone else. What an amazing place!

I learnt a lot from going to Chichen Itza and it was definitely worth it.

My advice when visiting this site is to go as early as possible, many tours leave at 7am and get there around 12, at that time it is intense heat and very busy. If you want a calm cool(er) time then try and get there as early as possible.  😀

In my next blog I will write about my trip to the Mayan ruins of Coba.

Quickfire questions on life before and after Osteotomy procedure.

So this blog is written by Priya. We met with my surgeon Mr Minhal Chatoo at the One Hatfield hospital on 8th May and he recommended Priya interviews me to share how life has changed pre- and post- Osteotomy.

Hi, Priya here. I thought of a bunch of questions to ask my dad about his progress.


This is Hertford Castle, near where we live and where we went for a walk.


How has the pain around your leg changed since the Osteotomy operation?
Every day and every week I notice that the pain is getting less. However I do notice new pains appearing. The swelling in my leg is still there but is gradually reducing. The Osteotemy does entail bone cutting, drilling, cutting deep into flesh, muscle and many nerves. It does take a long time for the healing process to complete.

What life changes have you made since your first diagnosis?

I have made an effort to lose weight and eat the right foods. I have cut down alcohol, sugar and some types of meat. I have had to stop jogging due to the impact on my knees however I have now started going to the gym more where I run on the treadmill, use the cross trainer and lift weights to strengthen my core. If I can lose more weight I may be able to run again.

How has the operation influenced your life now?

To be more aware of long term health. I know I cannot run as much or kick a football about as much, so I need to find new sports/pass times to get involved in. Also life is about longevity so doing the right exercise is key.

How might the operation impact others around you?

As his daughter I have seen a urge in my father to lose weight and really exercise more. The effect this has on me is that as a family we go out and walk in different new locations on a weekly basis. This is a more active effect on my life and it’s for the better, as we are also eating healthier and experimenting more activities.

How do you think you can help others?

If you are young enough and want to continue having an active life, there is an alternative to a knee replacement surgery. The operation does give you the chance to defer such an intrusive operation for a number of years. The psychological impact of getting your life back to a normal balance is very important.

Priya’s travels in Malaysia

I recently got back from Malaysia where I stayed for just under 2 weeks. I originally flew to Kuala Lumpur and got a connecting flight to a beautiful island called Langkawi. Langkawi is a stunning island that is covered by lush rainforest. I was lucky enough to stay in the rainforest and I saw loads of animals: spiders, lizards, butterflies, tons of monkeys and a scorpion.

  Langkawi is home to a cable car which is at the top of a high mountain, the best views of the island are seen from there. With a skybridge as another attraction it was definitely worth  going there. A mangrove tour at the north of the island was extremely fun with views of Thailand and a bat cave that smelt horrible!

The beaches were beautiful and the people were lovely and heart warming. Crab, lobster, tiger prawns were just a few exotic foods that we ate. Overall I really enjoyed this holiday and highly recommend the island to whoever wants to go to Asia.

A picture i took on my iphone.

Then I went to Kuala Lumpur (also known as KL) and it was completely different! There was lots of light pollution and pollution its self from all the inner city traffic – KL was very busy and was very cosmopolitan with people from different backgrounds everywhere, but mainly Malay, Chinese and Indian heritage.

Chinatown was packed with foods. sounds and smells I’ve never witnessed before. The Petronas Towers were amazing and even better at night. The shopping malls were crazy as they were huge and one even had an indoor theme park. It was a enjoyable experience because it was a big contrast from where we had recently stayed.

Overall, Malaysia is a country like no other, because the people were kind and the cultural differences didn’t matter.